The SoTL Advocate

Supporting efforts to make public the reflection and study of teaching and learning at Illinois State University and beyond…


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Call for University-Wide SoTL Award Open

Applications are sought for the 2018 Dr. John Chizamr & Dr. Anthony Ostrosky Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Award. This award recognizes faculty and academic staff at ISU who have contributed to the field of SoTL, the SoTL body of knowledge, improved teaching, and enhanced learning.

Applications should be submitted by Monday, November 13, 2017. Requirements for application are detailed below. Information about past award recipients and application procedures can be found on the Cross Chair website, as well. Please contact Jen Friberg (jfribe@ilstu.edu) with questions about this award.

SoTL Award18

 


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Seeking Blog Contributors for Fall 2017 SoTL Methods Series

Written by: Jennifer Friberg, Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL and Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Illinois State University

searchIn the early days of the SoTL Advocate, I featured a short-lived methods blog series that provided overviews of three research methods common to SoTL inquiry: case study, content analysis, and survey. These blogs functioned as brief overviews of each method and provided readers with resources to better understand these methods and exemplar articles to access, as well. Recently, several readers have asked for this series to be expanded, which I think is a wonderful idea! To that end, this fall, I plan to offer a multi-week continuation of the SoTL methods series, with specific methods included in this series to be determined.

Why are the topics yet to be determined? I hope to feature guest blog contributors in this series to represent the interesting and broad approaches to SoTL across disciplines and countries. It is my aim that each submitted blog will:

  1. Define/describe the method of focus for the blog.
  2. Provide an overview of a project where this method was used, along with a reflection on WHY this method was selected over others.
  3. Offer resources for readers to view other examples or descriptions of this method in SoTL (preferred) or discipline-specific scholarship.
  4. Cite references for all resources noted in the blog.
  5. Provide affiliations and contact information for all blog contributors.

Do not feel as though you have to be a recognized “expert” on the method you write about — you just have to be willing to share what you’ve learned through reading or using the method you have chosen. Single author contributions from students or faculty are welcome, but please feel free to invite colleagues and/or students to co-contribute, as well.

Blogs should be approximately 750 words in length and should be written in a friendly and accessible manner, absent unneeded disciplinary jargon that might make a general SoTL readership unable to benefit from accessing the content of the post. Visuals (e.g., open source pictures, photos, videos) are encouraged, as more people will “click” on a blog link if a visual is attached!

If you are interested in submitting a blog for this series, please email me, Jen Friberg (jfribe@ilstu.edu), with a brief statement of interest by August 1, 2017 as I want to ensure we do not have unnecessary overlap in topics. Final blogs should submitted to me by September 15, 2017 for review and formatting. It is anticipated that this methods series will be featured in the SoTL Advocate from October-November, 2017.

A bit of information about the SoTL Advocate blog (i.e., history and reach) is presented below:

About the Blog: The SoTL Advocate was established by the Office of the Cross Endowed Chair in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at Illinois State University (ISU) to highlight interesting SoTL work and encourage discussion within the SoTL community on various topics of interest to those working on SoTL at ISU and beyond. It is the goal of the SoTL Advocate that blogs will feature viewpoints of a diverse authorship, discussing SoTL projects, reflections, ideas, and topics that are representative of the global nature of the study of teaching and learning.

Blog Reach: Since November 2014, over 7000 visitors (representing 56 countries) have viewed blog content. On average, the SoTL Advocate is accessed over 40 times a week by unique viewers. All blog posts are publicized via the Twitter (250 followers) and Facebook (75 followers) accounts managed by the Office of the Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL. Blog authors can request specific hashtags/attributions for these posts, as appropriate.

Blog Post Guidelines: Blogs should be approximately 750 words (500-1000 word range is acceptable). Blogs should be written in a friendly and accessible manner, absent unneeded disciplinary jargon that might make a general SoTL readership unable to benefit from accessing the content of the post. Visuals (e.g., open source pictures, photos, videos) are encouraged, as more people will “click” on a blog link if a visual is attached!

Submission of a blog does not guarantee acceptance for publication. All blog submissions are reviewed by the SoTL Advocate editor for content and form prior to notification of acceptance status. Please note that blog posts may be conditionally accepted for publication pending revision/clarification. Blogs accepted for publication under this call for contributors will be published between October and November of 2017 as part of the SoTL Methods Series.


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ISU’s FY18 SoTL University Research Grants Awarded

Written by Jennifer Friberg, Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL and Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders

STATE_YourLearningIn mid-June, a total of $20,000 was awarded by the Office of the Cross Endowed Chair at ISU to fund SoTL research in the approaching fiscal year. A total of 21 project proposals were received, making this year’s competition very competitive! Grant awards were made to seven faculty and five students representing a diverse mix of six schools/departments and five colleges across ISU’s campus. Abstracts from each project are presented below. Congratulations to all who earned project funding in this cycle!

Information about this grant program can be found here.

Assessing Dietetics Students Self-Efficacy, Knowledge, and Competence of Small Bowl Feeding Tube Insertion Using Patient Simulation

Julie Raeder Schumacher (Associate Professor) & Jamey Baietto (Gradaute Student), Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

Minimal research exists to validate feeding tube insertion simulation as an effective strategy to teach dietetic students. The purpose of this study will be to assess the change in self-efficacy and content knowledge of ISU dietetics graduate students to place bedside small bowel feeding tubes in simulated patients. Specifically, the following research questions guide this study: 1.) How will students’ knowledge of feeding tube insertion change from per-test to post-test after a simulation lab experience? 2.) How will students’ self-efficacy of feeding tube insertion change following a simulation lab experience? 3.) What will students’ level of competence be during the simulation lab as measured by the Memorial Medical Center Competency Checklist? and 4.) What will students’ perceptions be of their learning experience during the feeding tube insertion simulation lab (assessed via a focus group after lab is completed)?

Assessing Student Learning Outcomes of Participation in Study Abroad Programs at ISU

Lea Cline (Assistant Professor, School of Art), Kathryn Jasper (Assistant Professor, Department of History), & Erin Mikulec (Associate Professor, School of Teaching and Learning)

As a result of internationalization efforts at Illinois State University, more students are participating in study abroad programs offered through the Office of International Studies and Programs (OISP), which estimates there are currently over 90 programs operating in 47 countries. This study will evaluate the professional and personal learning outcomes of students participating in study abroad programs at ISU. The participants represent students participating in these study abroad programs of diverse class rank and major. The proposed project clearly fits SoTL as defined by ISU as the focus of the study is to gather data about and evaluate ISU students’ learning outcomes resulting from living and studying in a unique educational setting. The results of this study will be used to evaluate the impact of study abroad experiences on students’ personal and professional development, including intercultural competence, and to inform current practices for study abroad programs at ISU.

The Rewards of Civic Engagement & Out-of-Class Learning: One Stitch at a Time

Elisabeth Reed (Instructional Assistant Professor) & Sophia Araya (Undergraduate Student), Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

Fix It Friday is a program at Illinois State University in which students majoring in the Fashion Design and Merchandising (FDM) program set up sewing machines in various locations within the surrounding Bloomington-Normal community and offer free basic sewing, mending, and clothing repair services to anyone in need. The fashion students lend their time, talent, and skills on a completely volunteer basis. The purpose of this study to explore student perceptions before and after their volunteer experience, and collect testimonials of both students and customers during the Fix It Friday events. This information will be compiled into a short documentary film to provide a framework and rationale for other schools and Universities to which this program could be implemented. By collecting data on what types of items are fixed while simultaneously accumulating testimonials and feedback from both students and customers, we can attest to the overall holistic merits of the Fix It Friday program. While it is believed that the program has been meaningful and transformative for the students thus far, strategic and methodical research is required in order to assess the out-of-class learning outcomes and the value of civic engagement the Fix It Friday program has brought to both students and community members.

Agile Scrum in a BIS Undergraduate Capstone Course: Going from Being Students to Being Professionals

Roslin Hauck (Associate Professor), Gunjan Amin (Graduate Student), & Cole Mikesell, (Graduate Student), Department of Accounting and Business Information Systems

Agile Scrum is a developmental approach that is becoming increasingly popular as a framework to guide complex software and systems development projects. While the tools, artifacts, and events that are part of Agile Scrum are used to manage teamwork, it does so with the principles of transparency, adaptation, and inspection to encourage the values of commitment, courage, focus, openness, and respect within the Scrum Team (Schwaber & Sutherland, 2016). While the purpose is to ultimately create a technical system, much of the focus of Agile Scrum is on aspects of teamwork, including reflection, communication, self-organization, iterative and empirical learning. In this proposed research study, we will share our experience from both an instructor and student perspectives of the use of Agile Scrum in a Business Information Systems capstone course. In addition to presenting data collected from students from four semesters of  this course (sample size of ~50-60), we will also discuss key artifacts, roles, and activities used in the classroom, such as demonstration exercises, Scrum Master and Product Owner leadership roles, and student and team derived learning objectives and self-assessments.

Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivation: An Experiment on the Role of Competitions in Teaching and Learning

Elahe Javadi (Assistant Professor) & Shaivam Verma (Graduate Student), School of Information Technology

Understanding, analyzing, and interpreting data for making reasoned decisions is a crucial dimension of being a responsible citizen in the digital era. To advance students’ learning experience in an applied data-mining course (IT344), this project aims to design, implement, and evaluate competition-based learning in the course. The study will employ a within-group field experiment design. During the course, students will complete interleaved competition-based and regular predictive modeling assignments. Students’ motivation for learning, satisfaction with learning process, and learning outcomes will be compared for competition and regular assignments.

 


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New Volume of Gauisus Published

The fifth volume of Gauisus, ISU’s internal, multimedia SoTL publication was published today. This volume features the work of 26 Redbirds (13 faculty and 13 students) across six departments/schools. Work in this volume is organized into two tracks: SoTL Research and Scholarly Approaches to Teaching. The Scholarly Approaches to Teaching track is new to this volume and represents an effort to highlight application of SoTL research to inform decision-making. Abstracts and hyperlinks for each article can be found below.

The call for Volume 6 of Gauisus is now open. Past volumes of Gauisus can be accessed here. Happy reading!

 

TRACK: SoTL Research
Math Anxiety Among First-Year Graduate Students in Communication Sciences and Disorders
Jamie Mahurin Smith • Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Students in allied health fields use math for a variety of tasks in their classes and in the field. Math anxiety can interfere with completion of these tasks; no published reports describe the prevalence or extent of math anxiety in this population. Two cohorts of first-year graduate students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD; n = 73) used the modified Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Attitude Survey to evaluate their own math ability and math anxiety. For many of the survey items, a strongly bimodal response pattern was observed. Across both cohorts, one group of students felt confident and competent with regard to math-related tasks, while another group reported anxiety and doubt. The presence of strongly divergent feelings about course material may present challenges for instructors and students alike. Potential responses are discussed.
Acquiring Global Competencies at Illinois State University
Maria Schmeeckle, Editor • Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Our “Senior Experience” research capstone class sought to answer the following question: “What types of global competencies are college seniors acquiring at Illinois State University, and what school-sponsored experiences allow them to acquire these competencies?” To answer this, our team of nine students conducted 30 semi-structured interviews with a diverse group of students in their senior year at Illinois State University. We focused on seven competencies identified by ISU’s Office of International Studies and Programs: Critical Cosmopolitanism, Social Cohesion, Cultural Sensitivity, Social Responsibility, Intercultural Communication, Bilingualism, and Global Dexterity. We found that almost all of our participating seniors perceived that they had acquired some degree of the seven global competencies and found them to be important for their lives. Interview participants reported the highest exposure to cultural sensitivity, social responsibility, and intercultural communication, and the lowest exposure to bilingualism. Within course-related activities, classes and professors appeared to be the best sources of global competency development. Within non-course-related activities, student organizations were mentioned the most often. In their final reflections, the research team suggested that the university make greater efforts to help students realize that they are acquiring global competencies, which are tangible skills in our increasingly interconnected and interdependent world.
The student researchers collaborated on all aspects of the research process, including refining research questions, reading and synthesizing the literature, developing the interview guide, conducting interviews, transcribing and analyzing the interviews, summarizing the findings, and connecting findings back to related studies and ISU’s internationalization efforts. In alphabetical order, the student researchers were: Jonathan Aguirre, Michael Drake, Felicia Kopec, Alicia Ramos, Shelby Stork, Stacy Strickler, Erin Sullivan, Annie Taylor, and Melisa Trout.
Improving the Graduate Student Experience thought Out-of-Class Experiences
Rebecca AchenSchool of Kinesiology and Recreation
Clint WarrenSchool of Kinesiology and Recreation
Hannah JorichSchool of Kinesiology and Recreation
Amanda FazzariSchool of Kinesiology and Recreation
Ken Thorne
 • School of Kinesiology and Recreation
This study evaluated student experiences and learning outcomes related to the professional field trip, which is designed to encourage connection between students and improve professional skills. Twenty-two graduate students attended the trip to Milwaukee, WI, where they participated in a networking event with industry professionals, toured an arena and Marquette athletics, and attended a baseball game. The trip was evaluated using pre- and post-trip surveys, a focus group, and interviews with professionals that the students interacted with. Results suggested the trip met students’ expectations, improved their connection to their cohort, clarified their professional goals, and improved their networking skills.
Using Simulations to Improve Interprofessional Communication and Role Identification between Nursing Student and Child Life Specialist Students
Peggy Jacobs• Mennonite College of Nursing
Sheri KellyMennonite College of Nursing
Keri Edwards • Department of Family and Consumer Sciences
Lynn Kennell Mennonite College of Nursing
Cindy Malinowski Mennonite College of Nursing
Based on Recommendations by the World Health Organization to improve patient outcomes through teamwork and communication, the college of nursing collaborated with the child life specialist program to incorporate interprofessional collaboration into existing simulations. A quasi-experimental design with a pre and post-test regarding roles was used to discover how 3rd semester undergraduate nursing students and 3rd semester graduate child life specialist students (CSL) communicate during four simulated pediatric care scenarios. Consenting to participate were 49 nursing students and 4 CLS students.  The intervention group included a CLS. Videotaped simulations and audio taped debriefings were evaluated with the validated Interprofessional Collaborator Assessment Rubric (ICAR). Significant differences were found in communication and collaborative patient family approach. Nursing students showed greater growth in role understanding of the CLS (pre-13.69, post-14.13) compared to the CLS of the nursing role (pre-8.6, post-9.4).  Students recognized the need to continue to improve their teamwork and communication.
Challenging Pre-Service Teachers; Evolutionary Acceptance in Introductory Biology
Rachel Sparks• School of Biological Sciences
Rebekka Darner Gougis• School of Biological Sciences
In this study, we examine the efficacy of an instructional intervention on pre-service teachers’ acceptance of evolutionary theory. We used diagnostic question clusters with ORCAS (Open-ended questioning, student Responses, Contradictory claims, Assessment of contradictions, and Summary) discourse to elicit students’ prior knowledge and compel evaluation of claims with evidence. Pre-and post-instruction evolutionary acceptance, nature-of-science understanding, and conceptual knowledge about evolution were measured qualitatively and quantitatively, indicating the instructional treatment was effective in fostering acceptance and understanding of evolution. We discuss implications for further research and preparing pre-service teachers for teaching evolution concepts.
TRACK: Scholarly Approaches to Teaching
Exploring the Designed Environment and Human Behavior Course
Taneshia West AlbertDepartment of Family and Consumer Sciences
Miyoung HongCollege of Architecture, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Core competencies such as analytical skills, content knowledge, and awareness of human behavior set the foundation for learning among emerging interior design professionals. A human behavior course is the perfect medium to synchronize these ideas in the context of interior design challenges. Presently, significant gaps exist regarding the pedagogical approaches that prepare interior design students to integrate these skills into innovative design solutions. This paper discusses how objectives identified through the literature review influence the creation of lecture activities, project assignments, and student assessment to meet each identified objective. The authors offer respective strategies for building the course curricula.


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First CSI-SoTL Student Cohort Earns Certificates

Written by Jennifer Friberg, Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL and Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Illinois State University

CSI-SOTL reception photo

Last Thursday, April 13, 2017, eleven ISU students were recognized at a reception for completing the Certificate of Specialized Instruction in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (CSI-SoTL). Representing ten disciplines and four colleges, these students earned this certificate by completing three program phases:

  • In Phase 1, students attended a series of three workshops in the fall of 2016 to learn about SoTL and scholarly teaching (SoTL and My Teaching and Learning, Planning a SoTL Project A, and Planning a SoTL Project B).
  • Phase 2 engaged students in a 1:1 mentoring experience with a disciplinary faculty mentor who had experience in SoTL. Students and their mentors designed a SoTL research project focused on a teaching/learning question identified by the student, problem-solving methodological issues, human subjects research considerations, and possible audiences for their SoTL work. While students were not required to conduct the SoTL project they planned, each student left Phase 2 with a blueprint to complete this project in the future.
  • Phase 3 consisted of individual, written reflection on SoTL, scholarly teaching and learning, the CSI-SoTL program, and the mentor/mentorship process.

The CSI-SoTL program was co-developed and co-sponsored by the Office of the Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL and the Graduate School at ISU. Both units would like to acknowledge both the students who earned their CSI-SoTL certificates as well as their faculty mentors, who volunteered their time and expertise to support their mentees this semester:

Taylor Bauer, COM (Mentor: Dr. Maria Moore, COM)

Olga Cochran, ENG (Mentor: Dr. Susan Burt, ENG)

Patricia Huete, SOC (Mentor: Dr. Frank Beck, SOC)

Matt Johnson, CHE (Mentor: Dr. Jean Sawyer, CSD)

Elizabeth Jones, ENG (Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Friberg, Cross Chair)

Jillian Joyce, COM (Mentor: Dr. Cheri Simonds, COM)

Theo Nzaranyimana, AGR (Mentor: Dr. Rob Rhykerd, AGR)

Mijan Rahman, ENG (Mentor: Dr. Susan Hildebrandt, LLC)

Lauralyn Randles, SED (Mentor: Dr. Olaya Landa-Vialard, SED)

Joe Rice, POL (Mentor: Dr. Michaelene Cox, POL)

Raj Sankaranarayanan, TEC (Mentor: Dr. Anu Gohkale, TEC)

Congratulations to all CSI-SoTL participants!

For additional information regarding the CSI-SoTL program, email Jen Friberg (Cross Chair in SoTL, jfribe@ilstu.edu) or Amy Hurd (Director of Graduate Studies, arhurd@ilstu.edu). 


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New Funding Opportunities for ISU SoTLists!

The Office of the Cross Endowed Chair in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at Illinois State University is accepting applications for two grant programs: FY18 University Research Grants and FY17 Summer Mini Grants. Information related to each of these funding programs can be accessed via the Cross Chair website. An overview is provided for each program below. Contact Jennifer Friberg (jfribe@ilstu.edu) with questions.

FY18 University Research Grants:

The Cross Endowed Chair in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning requests proposals for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning URG Grant Program. The program provides scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) small grants to study the developmental and learning outcomes of ISU students. For 2017-2018, funded projects can focus on the systematic study/reflection of any teaching-learning issue(s) explicitly related ISU students.

Grants of up to $5,000 are available. Funds may be used for any appropriate budget category (e.g., printing, commodities, contractual, travel, student help, and salary in FY18). While 4-5 grants are expected to be awarded, all awards are subject to the availability of funds allocated for FY18. Proposals should be submitted by 5/22/17.

urg summer

FY 17 Summer Mini Grants:

The Cross Endowed Chair in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning requests proposals for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning URG Grant Program. The program provides scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) small grants to study the developmental and learning outcomes of ISU students. This funding program will award six mini-grants of $600 each to ISU faculty via a competitive application process. These funds will be awarded as a June 2017 stipend for work on a new or ongoing SoTL project at any stage of completion (e.g., writing an IRB, analyzing data, writing up findings). Proposals should be submitted by April 24, 2017.

mini summer


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Spring SoTL Offerings at ISU

The Office of the Cross Endowed Chair in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning will offer three events this spring: two workshops and a brown bag lunch with the Chair of our IRB to discuss protection of human subjects in SoTL research.

Reservations via email to Jen Friberg (jfribe@ilstu.edu) will be taken for ISU faculty, starting next Monday, 2/6/17.  Read below for details on each event:

screen-shot-2017-01-30-at-8-34-16-am