The SoTL Advocate

Supporting efforts to make public the reflection and study of teaching and learning at Illinois State University and beyond…


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Where Can My SoTL Be Published? A Focus on Business-Related Disciplines

Written by: Jennifer Friberg, Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL and Associate Professor of Communication Sciences & Disorders at Illinois State University

 This week is the third installment in the series that started in February with the question “where can my SoTL be published?” This week, the spotlight is on SoTL publication outlets for business-related fields such as: accounting, business administration, business information, business education, finance, insurance, international business, management, marketing, and economics.

The list below presents links for SoTL-friendly business journals, organized by discipline. Each link is accompanied by a brief description of each journal’s aim/scope/mission (often excerpted verbatim from each journal’s website). I hope you find this list helpful and would encourage readers of the blog to suggest additions to this list!

Journal Name Aim/Scope/Mission of Journal (excerpted, sometimes verbatim, from journal websites)
Accounting
Accounting Education Accounting Education is a peer-reviewed international journal devoted to publishing research-based papers on key aspects of accounting education and training of relevance to practitioners, academics, trainers, students and professional bodies, particularly papers dealing with the effectiveness of accounting education or training.
Global Perspectives on Accounting Education No aims/mission/scope were provided on the journal website.
Issues in Accounting Education The mission of Issues in Accounting Education is to publish research, commentaries, instructional resources, and book reviews that assist accounting faculty in teaching and that address important issues in accounting education. Issues of the journal consists of two major sections: Research and Commentary and Instructional Resources.
Journal of Accounting Education The Journal of Accounting Education is a refereed journal dedicated to promoting and publishing research on accounting education issues and to improving the quality of accounting education worldwide. The Journal provides a vehicle for making results of empirical studies available to educators and for exchanging ideas, instructional resources, and best practices that help improve accounting education.
Business Administration/Information
Business Education & Accreditation Business Education & Accreditation publishes high-quality articles in all areas of business education, curriculum, educational methods, educational administration, advances in educational technology and accreditation. Theoretical, empirical and applied manuscripts are welcome for publication consideration.
Business Education Forum Business Education Forum is a professional journal, written by practitioners, for practitioners. Articles published in the Forum aim to interest teachers in the field of business education and improve learning for students by making teaching more effective and creative.
International Journal for Business Education The purpose of IJBE is to provide international business educators with articles concerning current and/or future teaching strategies as they relate to business education, research-based articles on business education and technology ideas for business education. The focus can be from any area of business education including technology, communications, leadership, management, marketing, etc. that will be of interest to international business educators.
Journal for Global Business Administration The Journal for Global Business Education is a refereed publication of the United States chapter of the International Society for Business Education (ISBE). The U.S. Chapter is one of multiple chapters of the Société pour l’Enseignment Commercial (SIEC). These chapters represent different countries that are engaged in education for international business.

Submitted manuscripts should focus on International Business and may include reviews of literature, research, teaching methodologies, and other appropriate options.

Journal of Applied Research for Business Administration No aim/scope/mission listed on the journal website.
Journal of Business Ethics Education The Journal of Business Ethics Education seeks to publish educational materials suitable for use in ethics courses or in other business courses where ethical issues are discussed. These include case studies, lecture articles for student use, articles and ethical analyses for instructors, role-playing material, syllabi and curricula, and downloadable software or audio/visual material. There is a particular emphasis on approaches that encourage student participation as opposed to passive learning.
Journal of Education for Business The Journal of Education for Business features basic and applied research-based articles in entrepreneurship, accounting, communications, economics, finance, information systems, management, marketing, and other business disciplines. Articles report successful innovations in teaching and curriculum development at the college and postgraduate levels. Authors address changes in today’s business world and in the business professions that are fundamentally influencing the competencies that business graduates need.
Journal of Entrepreneurship Education The Journal of Entrepreneurship Education publishes theoretical or empirical works in entrepreneurship education and training.
Journal of International Business Education The mission of the Journal of International Business Education is to enhance education in international business worldwide through the publication of high quality refereed teaching materials, articles on key developments in teaching methods and technologies, and new institutional frameworks for international business education.
Economics & Finance
Journal of Economic Education The Journal of Economic Education offers original articles on teaching economics. In its pages, leading scholars evaluate innovations in teaching techniques, materials, and programs. Instructors of introductory through graduate level economics will find the journal an indispensable resource for content and pedagogy in a variety of media.
Journal of Economics and Finance Education The Journal of Economics and Finance Education (JEFE) is a general interest publication, which targets articles in the area of economic and finance education. JEFE invites economic and finance contributions in three main areas: research, instruction, and content. The journal encourages empirical and methodological contributions and will entertain theoretical articles in some instances.
Journal of Financial Education The Journal of Financial Education is devoted to promoting financial education through publication of articles that focus on educational research, creative pedagogy, and curriculum development. We publish articles that help improve the delivery of financial education through research that tests hypotheses regarding all aspects of the educational process, pedagogical papers that offer interesting or unique approaches to teaching, case studies, and literature reviews.  In particular, we strive to tie educational ideas and innovations discussed in the journal to assurance of learning principles whenever possible.
International Business
Journal of Teaching in International Business The Journal of Teaching in International Business instructs international business educators, curriculum developers, and institutions of higher education worldwide on methods and techniques for better teaching to ensure a global mindset and optimum, cost-effective learning in international business. This journal contains original, significant, scholarly, and applied articles that: say something meaningful to international business curriculum developers; use empirical data and analysis to show the effectiveness of various approaches to teaching international business; enrich and make more effective the classroom presentations of teachers of international business; facilitate research endeavors of international business consultants, researchers, business education foundations, and institutions of higher learning.
Management
Academy of Management Learning & Education AMLE examines pressing issues in the fields of management learning and education by presenting theory, models, research, critiques, dialogues and retrospectives that address the learning process and the practice of management education. Its audience includes scholars, educators, program directors and deans at academic institutions, as well as practitioners in training and development and corporate education.
Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education The Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education is a peer-reviewed journal of the Decision Sciences Institute. Its mission is to publish significant research relevant to teaching, learning, and education in the decision sciences – quantitative and behavioral approaches to managerial decision making. The journal welcomes submissions relevant to the application and practice of the decision sciences both in business and other domains such as, but not limited to, healthcare, product development, and engineering management.
International Journal of Management Education The International Journal of Management Education provides a forum for scholarly reporting and discussion of developments in all aspects of teaching and learning in business and management. The Journal seeks reflective papers which bring together pedagogy and theories of management learning; descriptions of innovative teaching which include critical reflection on implementation and outcomes will also be considered.
Journal of Management Education Journal of Management Education (JME), peer-reviewed and published bi-monthly, is a leading voice in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) in management. JME welcomes contributions from all management educators who seek to reflect on their professional practice and to engage readers in an exploration of what or how to teach in order for students to learn and practice effective management.
Management Learning Management Learning, the ‘Journal for Critical, Reflexive Scholarship on Organization and Learning’, is a fully peer-reviewed international journal publishing original theoretical, empirical and exploratory articles on learning and knowing in management and organizations.
Marketing
Journal of Marketing Education Journal of Marketing Education (JMD) provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, information, and experiences related to educating students of marketing and advertising. JMD is the leading peer-reviewed, international scholarly journal publishing articles on the latest techniques in marketing education, emphasizing new course content, effective teaching methods, and professional issues.
Marketing Education Review Marketing Education Review is a great resource for instructors to find innovative, assessment-driven tools and techniques to improve classroom instruction and the student learning experience. Its focus is to promote innovative approaches to curriculum design, student learning and faculty development.

 


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Where Can My SoTL Be Published? A Focus on Health-Related Disciplines

Written by: Jennifer Friberg, Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL and Associate Professor of Communication Sciences & Disorders at Illinois State University

In February of this year, a blog was posted to address the question “where can my SoTL be published?” That blog provided a list of cross-/multi-/inter-disciplinary SoTL publication outlets for SoTL research to be published. A promise was made at that time that future blogs would focus on disciplinary SoTL publication outlets. I will make good on that promise today and over the next several weeks!

The focus this week is SoTL publication outlets in health-related disciplines, including: speech-language pathology/audiology, dentistry, psychiatry, respiratory therapy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, nursing, and medicine. The list below presents cross-disciplinary health care journals as well as journals specific to research on teaching and learning in individual disciplines. Links for each journal are provided along with a brief description of each journal’s aim/scope/mission (often excerpted verbatim from each journal’s website).

I hope you find this list helpful and would encourage readers of the blog to suggest additions to this list!

Cross-Disciplinary Publication Outlets:

Journal Name Aim/Scope/Mission of Journal

(excerpted, sometimes verbatim, from journal websites)

Advances in Health Science Education Advances in Health Sciences Education (AHSE) is a forum for scholarly and state-of-the art research into all aspects of health sciences education. It will publish empirical studies as well as discussions of theoretical issues and practical implications. The primary focus of the Journal is linking theory to practice, thus priority will be given to papers that have a sound theoretical basis and strong methodology. AHSE will accept articles on topics such as admissions, problem-based and self-directed learning, faculty development, achievement testing, motivation, curriculum development, curricular comparisons, program evaluation, expertise development, clinical reasoning, continuing education, community-based education, and communication skills (the list is intended as illustrative, not exhaustive).
The Clinical Teacher The Clinical Teacher is the journal for clinicians who teach and people who are involved in education in a health care setting. It provides access to research, practice and thinking in clinical education across the health professions. Each issue features sections on specific teaching approaches, reports and evaluation of innovative learning activities, a digest of the latest research published in Medical Education and other relevant journals, reports of innovative thinking and advances in clinical teaching from around the world, and expert commentary and discussion on challenging and controversial issues in today’s clinical education.
Gerontology & Geriatrics Education Gerontology & Geriatrics Education is a peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the exchange of information related to research, curriculum development, course and program evaluation, classroom and practice innovation, and other topics with educational implications for gerontology and geriatrics. It is designed to appeal to a broad range of readers, including faculty, students, practitioners, administrators, and policy makers and is dedicated to disseminating cutting edge and evidence-based knowledge in the field of gerontology and geriatrics education.
Medical Education Medical Education seeks to be the pre-eminent journal in the field of education for health care professionals, and publishes material of the highest quality, reflecting world-wide or provocative issues and perspectives. The journal welcomes high quality papers on all aspects of health professional education including undergraduate education, postgraduate training, continuing professional development, and interprofessional education.
Medical Teacher Medical Teacher, the journal of the Association for Medical Education in Europe, addresses the needs of teachers and administrators involved in training for the health professions. This includes courses at basic and post-basic levels as well as the increasingly important area of continuing education. Medical Teacher provides accounts of new teaching methods, guidance on structuring courses and assessing achievement, and serves as a forum for communication between medical teachers and those involved in general education. The journal features reports of innovation and research in medical education, case studies, survey articles, practical guidelines, reviews of current literature and book reviews. All articles are peer reviewed.

 

Discipline-Specific Publication Outlets:

Journal Name Aim/Scope/Mission of Journal

(excerpted, sometimes verbatim, from journal websites)

Communication Sciences & Disorders (Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology)
Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders Teaching and Learning in Communication Sciences & Disorders (TLCSD) publishes articles that reflect current and exemplary scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) research in speech-language pathology and audiology. Articles submitted to TLCSD may also reflect current trends in the format of SoTL work, including original research, quantitative or qualitative in nature, reflective essays and case studies, both grounded in the literature. Manuscripts related to teaching and learning in continuing education contexts as well as in higher education will be considered.
Dental Care
Journal of Dental Education The Journal of Dental Education (JDE) is a peer-reviewed monthly journal that publishes a wide variety of educational and scientific research in dental, allied dental and advanced dental education. JDE publishes articles on such topics as curriculum reform, education research methods, innovative educational and assessment methodologies, faculty development, community-based dental education, student recruitment and admissions, professional and educational ethics, dental education around the world and systematic reviews of educational interest.
Medicine
Academic Medicine Academic Medicine serves as an international forum for the exchange of ideas, information, and strategies to address the major challenges facing the academic medicine community as it strives to carry out its missions in the public interest. The journal’s areas of focus include: education and training issues; health and science policy; institutional policy, management, and values; research practice; and clinical practice in academic settings.
Advances in Physiology Education Advances in Physiology Education promotes and disseminates educational scholarship in order to enhance teaching and learning of physiology, neuroscience and pathophysiology. The journal publishes peer-reviewed descriptions of innovations that improve teaching in the classroom and laboratory, essays on education, and review articles based on our current understanding of physiological mechanisms.
Anatomical Sciences Education Anatomical Sciences Education provides an international forum for the exchange of ideas, opinions, innovations and research on topics related to education in the anatomical sciences of gross anatomy, embryology, histology, and neurosciences at all levels of anatomical sciences education including, undergraduate, graduate, post-graduate, allied health, medical (both allopathic and osteopathic), and dental.
Teaching and Learning in Medicine Teaching and Learning in Medicine (TLM) is an international, peer-reviewed forum for scholarly investigation of teaching and learning in medical education. Its mission is to advance the knowledge, understanding, and decision making capacity of medical educators through the dissemination of the highest levels of scholarship. TLM ’s scope includes all levels of medical education, from premedical to postgraduate and continuing medical education.
Nursing
Journal of Nursing Education The Journal of Nursing Education is a monthly, peer-reviewed journal publishing original articles and new ideas for nurse educators in various types and levels of nursing programs for over 50 years. The Journal enhances the teaching-learning process, promotes curriculum development, and stimulates creative innovation and research in nursing education.
Journal of Professional Nursing The Journal of Professional Nursing accepts articles that focus on baccalaureate and higher degree nursing education, educational research, policy related to education, and education and practice partnerships. Reports of original work, research, reviews, insightful descriptions, and policy papers focusing on baccalaureate and graduate nursing education will be published.
Nutrition
Journal of Food Science Education JFSE is aimed at all those committed to the improvement of food science education, including primary, secondary, undergraduate, graduate, continuing, and workplace education. Topics covered include problem-based learning and innovative learning techniques, development of teachers and students, innovative laboratory exercised, and interpersonal and human relationship development of students.
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior The Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (JNEB) is a refereed, scientific periodical that serves as a global resource for all professionals with an interest in nutrition education; nutrition and physical activity behavior theories and intervention outcomes; complementary and alternative medicine related to nutrition behaviors; food environment; food, nutrition, and physical activity communication strategies including technology; nutrition-related economics; food safety education; and scholarship of learning related to these areas.
Occupational Therapy
Journal of Occupational Therapy Education JOTE seeks to ensure that pedagogical practices in occupational therapy and occupational science are grounded in research, and evaluated for impact and effectiveness. JOTE encourages occupational therapy educators to share viable theoretical frameworks, innovative educational methods, and new knowledge to support best practice. JOTE welcomes a variety of topics for submission, including original research, theory, educational innovations, review of educational material, and technology updates.
Optometry/Ophthalmology
Journal of Academic Opthalmology No aims/scope listed for journal but current issue articles appear to be related to SoTL.
Journal of Optometric Education The goal of the Journal is to embrace and support scholarly achievements for the advancement of optometric education and the profession. The scope of the Journal supports a broad interpretation of scholarship based on the scholarship of discovery, integration, application and teaching.
Physical Therapy
Journal of Physical Therapy Education The Journal of Physical Therapy Education advances the scholarship of physical therapy education by disseminating scholarly works of discovery, application, and integration and enriches physical therapy academic and clinical education environments by using evidence into the educational decision-making process to effectively prepare students, support faculty and clinicians, and inform administrators.
Psychiatry
Academic Psychiatry The Journal’s mission supports work that furthers knowledge and stimulates evidence-based advances in academic medicine in six key domains: education, leadership, finance and administration, career and professional development, ethics and professionalism, and health and well-being. Original articles present empirical research, systematic reviews, or critical analyses that inform one of these six key domains, important to academic psychiatry, behavioral sciences, and the health professions.
Respiratory Therapy
Respiratory Care Education Annual The Respiratory Care Education Annual is published each fall. This refereed journal is committed to providing a forum for research and theory in respiratory care education. The Respiratory Care Education Annual showcases scholarly work within the educational community to promote best practices and research in respiratory care education.
Social Work
Journal of Social Work Education The Journal of Social Work Education is a refereed professional journal concerned with education in social work and social welfare. Its purpose is to serve as a forum for creative exchange on trends, innovations, and problems relevant to social work education at the undergraduate, master’s, and postgraduate levels.
Journal of Teaching in Social Work Through articles focusing on the teacher, the teaching process, and new contexts of teaching, the Journal of Teaching in Social Work is a forum for teaching and learning processes and the factors affecting their quality. Articles that focus on the teacher, the teaching process, the learner, and the learning process, as well as new contexts of teaching are considered for publication in the journal. Special attention is given to: field work teaching; in-service training; teaching aids and technologies; policy concerns that have an impact on the educational process.

 


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New Volume of Gauisus Published

The fifth volume of Gauisus, ISU’s internal, multimedia SoTL publication was published today. This volume features the work of 26 Redbirds (13 faculty and 13 students) across six departments/schools. Work in this volume is organized into two tracks: SoTL Research and Scholarly Approaches to Teaching. The Scholarly Approaches to Teaching track is new to this volume and represents an effort to highlight application of SoTL research to inform decision-making. Abstracts and hyperlinks for each article can be found below.

The call for Volume 6 of Gauisus is now open. Past volumes of Gauisus can be accessed here. Happy reading!

 

TRACK: SoTL Research
Math Anxiety Among First-Year Graduate Students in Communication Sciences and Disorders
Jamie Mahurin Smith • Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Students in allied health fields use math for a variety of tasks in their classes and in the field. Math anxiety can interfere with completion of these tasks; no published reports describe the prevalence or extent of math anxiety in this population. Two cohorts of first-year graduate students in communication sciences and disorders (CSD; n = 73) used the modified Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Attitude Survey to evaluate their own math ability and math anxiety. For many of the survey items, a strongly bimodal response pattern was observed. Across both cohorts, one group of students felt confident and competent with regard to math-related tasks, while another group reported anxiety and doubt. The presence of strongly divergent feelings about course material may present challenges for instructors and students alike. Potential responses are discussed.
Acquiring Global Competencies at Illinois State University
Maria Schmeeckle, Editor • Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Our “Senior Experience” research capstone class sought to answer the following question: “What types of global competencies are college seniors acquiring at Illinois State University, and what school-sponsored experiences allow them to acquire these competencies?” To answer this, our team of nine students conducted 30 semi-structured interviews with a diverse group of students in their senior year at Illinois State University. We focused on seven competencies identified by ISU’s Office of International Studies and Programs: Critical Cosmopolitanism, Social Cohesion, Cultural Sensitivity, Social Responsibility, Intercultural Communication, Bilingualism, and Global Dexterity. We found that almost all of our participating seniors perceived that they had acquired some degree of the seven global competencies and found them to be important for their lives. Interview participants reported the highest exposure to cultural sensitivity, social responsibility, and intercultural communication, and the lowest exposure to bilingualism. Within course-related activities, classes and professors appeared to be the best sources of global competency development. Within non-course-related activities, student organizations were mentioned the most often. In their final reflections, the research team suggested that the university make greater efforts to help students realize that they are acquiring global competencies, which are tangible skills in our increasingly interconnected and interdependent world.
The student researchers collaborated on all aspects of the research process, including refining research questions, reading and synthesizing the literature, developing the interview guide, conducting interviews, transcribing and analyzing the interviews, summarizing the findings, and connecting findings back to related studies and ISU’s internationalization efforts. In alphabetical order, the student researchers were: Jonathan Aguirre, Michael Drake, Felicia Kopec, Alicia Ramos, Shelby Stork, Stacy Strickler, Erin Sullivan, Annie Taylor, and Melisa Trout.
Improving the Graduate Student Experience thought Out-of-Class Experiences
Rebecca AchenSchool of Kinesiology and Recreation
Clint WarrenSchool of Kinesiology and Recreation
Hannah JorichSchool of Kinesiology and Recreation
Amanda FazzariSchool of Kinesiology and Recreation
Ken Thorne
 • School of Kinesiology and Recreation
This study evaluated student experiences and learning outcomes related to the professional field trip, which is designed to encourage connection between students and improve professional skills. Twenty-two graduate students attended the trip to Milwaukee, WI, where they participated in a networking event with industry professionals, toured an arena and Marquette athletics, and attended a baseball game. The trip was evaluated using pre- and post-trip surveys, a focus group, and interviews with professionals that the students interacted with. Results suggested the trip met students’ expectations, improved their connection to their cohort, clarified their professional goals, and improved their networking skills.
Using Simulations to Improve Interprofessional Communication and Role Identification between Nursing Student and Child Life Specialist Students
Peggy Jacobs• Mennonite College of Nursing
Sheri KellyMennonite College of Nursing
Keri Edwards • Department of Family and Consumer Sciences
Lynn Kennell Mennonite College of Nursing
Cindy Malinowski Mennonite College of Nursing
Based on Recommendations by the World Health Organization to improve patient outcomes through teamwork and communication, the college of nursing collaborated with the child life specialist program to incorporate interprofessional collaboration into existing simulations. A quasi-experimental design with a pre and post-test regarding roles was used to discover how 3rd semester undergraduate nursing students and 3rd semester graduate child life specialist students (CSL) communicate during four simulated pediatric care scenarios. Consenting to participate were 49 nursing students and 4 CLS students.  The intervention group included a CLS. Videotaped simulations and audio taped debriefings were evaluated with the validated Interprofessional Collaborator Assessment Rubric (ICAR). Significant differences were found in communication and collaborative patient family approach. Nursing students showed greater growth in role understanding of the CLS (pre-13.69, post-14.13) compared to the CLS of the nursing role (pre-8.6, post-9.4).  Students recognized the need to continue to improve their teamwork and communication.
Challenging Pre-Service Teachers; Evolutionary Acceptance in Introductory Biology
Rachel Sparks• School of Biological Sciences
Rebekka Darner Gougis• School of Biological Sciences
In this study, we examine the efficacy of an instructional intervention on pre-service teachers’ acceptance of evolutionary theory. We used diagnostic question clusters with ORCAS (Open-ended questioning, student Responses, Contradictory claims, Assessment of contradictions, and Summary) discourse to elicit students’ prior knowledge and compel evaluation of claims with evidence. Pre-and post-instruction evolutionary acceptance, nature-of-science understanding, and conceptual knowledge about evolution were measured qualitatively and quantitatively, indicating the instructional treatment was effective in fostering acceptance and understanding of evolution. We discuss implications for further research and preparing pre-service teachers for teaching evolution concepts.
TRACK: Scholarly Approaches to Teaching
Exploring the Designed Environment and Human Behavior Course
Taneshia West AlbertDepartment of Family and Consumer Sciences
Miyoung HongCollege of Architecture, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Core competencies such as analytical skills, content knowledge, and awareness of human behavior set the foundation for learning among emerging interior design professionals. A human behavior course is the perfect medium to synchronize these ideas in the context of interior design challenges. Presently, significant gaps exist regarding the pedagogical approaches that prepare interior design students to integrate these skills into innovative design solutions. This paper discusses how objectives identified through the literature review influence the creation of lecture activities, project assignments, and student assessment to meet each identified objective. The authors offer respective strategies for building the course curricula.


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First CSI-SoTL Student Cohort Earns Certificates

Written by Jennifer Friberg, Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL and Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Illinois State University

CSI-SOTL reception photo

Last Thursday, April 13, 2017, eleven ISU students were recognized at a reception for completing the Certificate of Specialized Instruction in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (CSI-SoTL). Representing ten disciplines and four colleges, these students earned this certificate by completing three program phases:

  • In Phase 1, students attended a series of three workshops in the fall of 2016 to learn about SoTL and scholarly teaching (SoTL and My Teaching and Learning, Planning a SoTL Project A, and Planning a SoTL Project B).
  • Phase 2 engaged students in a 1:1 mentoring experience with a disciplinary faculty mentor who had experience in SoTL. Students and their mentors designed a SoTL research project focused on a teaching/learning question identified by the student, problem-solving methodological issues, human subjects research considerations, and possible audiences for their SoTL work. While students were not required to conduct the SoTL project they planned, each student left Phase 2 with a blueprint to complete this project in the future.
  • Phase 3 consisted of individual, written reflection on SoTL, scholarly teaching and learning, the CSI-SoTL program, and the mentor/mentorship process.

The CSI-SoTL program was co-developed and co-sponsored by the Office of the Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL and the Graduate School at ISU. Both units would like to acknowledge both the students who earned their CSI-SoTL certificates as well as their faculty mentors, who volunteered their time and expertise to support their mentees this semester:

Taylor Bauer, COM (Mentor: Dr. Maria Moore, COM)

Olga Cochran, ENG (Mentor: Dr. Susan Burt, ENG)

Patricia Huete, SOC (Mentor: Dr. Frank Beck, SOC)

Matt Johnson, CHE (Mentor: Dr. Jean Sawyer, CSD)

Elizabeth Jones, ENG (Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Friberg, Cross Chair)

Jillian Joyce, COM (Mentor: Dr. Cheri Simonds, COM)

Theo Nzaranyimana, AGR (Mentor: Dr. Rob Rhykerd, AGR)

Mijan Rahman, ENG (Mentor: Dr. Susan Hildebrandt, LLC)

Lauralyn Randles, SED (Mentor: Dr. Olaya Landa-Vialard, SED)

Joe Rice, POL (Mentor: Dr. Michaelene Cox, POL)

Raj Sankaranarayanan, TEC (Mentor: Dr. Anu Gohkale, TEC)

Congratulations to all CSI-SoTL participants!

For additional information regarding the CSI-SoTL program, email Jen Friberg (Cross Chair in SoTL, jfribe@ilstu.edu) or Amy Hurd (Director of Graduate Studies, arhurd@ilstu.edu). 


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Bringing Together Academic Librarianship and SoTL

Written by Lauren Hays, Instructional and Research Librarian at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, KS. ldhays@mnu.edu  @Lib_Lauren

This post is in a sense declaring a hoped-for/planned career emphasis.  Let me introduce myself.  I am a librarian, academic, and SoTL enthusiast.  SoTL entered my professional career rather suddenly and unexpectedly.  Perhaps other academics start their careers with a narrowly defined scope.  I did not.  I just knew I loved higher education.  It was in my blood and bones.  Conceivably this was because I grew up living in married student housing while my dad pursued his Ph.D., which is where I remember seeing The Chronicle of Higher Education arrive weekly in the mail.  My love for higher education, though, is also likely due to my innate curiosity about the world and everything in it.

When deciding on a career, I decided to become a librarian because, well, why not?  I loved learning, books, students, and the buzz of academic life.  Those things are in the library, right?  After completing a masters of library science, I started work as an instructional and research librarian.  Working as a librarian is an excellent fit for me.  I enjoy research, students, faculty, and yes, the administrative work that comes along with working in a library.  My undergraduate degree, though, was in education, and at times I found myself missing the teaching and learning discourse in which I heard teaching faculty engage.

Early in my career I sought a professional network.  Margy MacMillan from Mount Royal University, who I had met through my library network, spoke passionately about SoTL.  From her descriptions, I knew I had to dig deeper.  Furthering my knowledge of SoTL confirmed that this was an area of academia where I wanted to focus my career.  Therefore, I decided to continue my education and pursue a Ph.D.  To be accepted into the doctoral program where I eventually enrolled I had to have a solid idea for my topic of study.  Therefore, I spent a lot of time reading about SoTL and academic librarians.  In my reading, I read about SoTL’s impact on faculties’ identities, and wondered if SoTL would have a similar impact on academic librarians’ identities.  This curiosity led to my current study on academic instruction librarians’ involvement in SoTL.  As I learned in a review of the literature, academic librarians do not always see themselves as teachers (Austin & Bhandol, 2013; Houtman, 2010).  Yet, teaching is an important part of many librarians’ jobs (Westbrock & Fabian, 2010; Wheeler & McKinney, 2015).  I also learned that librarians experience similar paths to becoming teachers as teaching faculty (Walter, 2005).  I anticipate defending my dissertation proposal this summer and starting to collect data after June.

My doctoral work has been all-consuming, but it has afforded me the opportunity to read a lot of journal articles.  As I dig deeper into the SoTL literature, I see the teaching and learning I want to discuss.  I see how my work as a librarian and the study of teaching and learning are complimentary.  Academic librarians support the full curriculum and teach information literacy.  Instruction librarians spend a lot of time thinking about teaching methods and the best ways to help students become literate in information.  Practical examples of this include the numerous presentations on teaching and learning at conferences such as LOEX and the Association of College and Research Libraries.  Additionally, the Association of College and Research Libraries published a Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education built on threshold concepts.  Prior to the Framework many librarians were unfamiliar with threshold concepts, and that led to debate about the Framework.  The debate surrounding the Framework underpinned my interest in engaging with the broader teaching commons—it is too easy to silo ourselves.

The work I see other librarians doing and the need for information literacy skills makes me eager, and impatient, for the time after dissertation writing when I can spend even more time with my work as a librarian, a SoTL researcher, and maybe someday an administrator with responsibilities bringing together SoTL and librarianship.

Specifically, I dream of future projects that center around:

  • Information literacy
  • Librarian-faculty teaching partnerships
  • Student-librarian partnerships
  • Teaching and learning in the Library and Information Science classroom
  • SoTL in faculty development
  • Signature pedagogies for information literacy
  • Co-curricular teaching and learning
  • Educational technology
  • And hopefully other projects that will benefit students

It is also a goal to connect the academic library community with the SoTL community.  I have colleagues who have done tremendous work in this area, and I hope to work alongside them.  Declaring a career trajectory is a little scary, but good too.  SoTL is a wide and varied field.  There is much I can imagine doing.  So, to all who paved the way and made SoTL what it is, thank you.  To all of you doing the good work of teaching and learning today, thank you.  And to all who will come after, I hope I can help create a path that will make librarianship, teaching, learning, and SoTL even better.

*For more information on librarians and SoTL, and to view the call for proposals for the forthcoming book The Grounded Instruction Librarian: Participating in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (working title) published by the Association of College and Research Libraries in 2018, please visit http://bit.ly/librarianSoTL.

*Special thanks to Cara Bradley, Jackie Belanger, Rhonda Huisman, Margy MacMillan, and Melissa Mallon for being such great colleagues.

Blog References:

Austin, T., & Bhandol, J. (2013). The academic librarian: Buying into, playing out, and resisting the teacher role in higher education. New Review of Academic Librarianship, 19(1), 15–35. http://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2012.740438

Houtman, E. (2010). “Trying to figure it out”: Academic librarians talk about learning to teach. Library and Information Research, 34(107), 18–40. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/article/view/246

Walter, S. (2005). Improving instruction: What librarians can learn from the study of college teaching. In P. Genoni & G. Walton (Eds.), Currents and Convergence: Navigating the Rivers of Change: Proceedings of the Twelfth National Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries, April 7-10, 2005, Minneapolis, Minnesota  (pp. 363-379). Chicago, IL: Association of College & Research Libraries.

Westbrock, T., & Fabian, S. (2010). Proficiencies for instruction librarians: Is there still a disconnect between professional education and professional responsibilities ? College & Research Libraries, 71(6), 569–590.

Wheeler, E., & Mckinney, P. (2015). Are librarians teachers? Investigating academic librarians’ perceptions of their own teaching roles. Journal of Information Literacy, 9(2), 111–128. http://doi.org/10.11645/9.2.1985

 


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University-School Partnerships and Pre-Service Teacher Preparation: A Travel Grant Report

Written by Sherry Sanden, Assistant Professor in the School of Teaching and Learning at Illinois State University

Screen Shot 2016-06-29 at 10.18.48 PMWith support from a SoTL Travel Grant awarded by the Office of the Cross Chair in SoTL at ISU, I attended the Association of Teacher Educators (ATE) Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida in February, 2017 to present a paper titled Examining the Impact of Multi-Year School-University Partnerships on Pre-service Teacher Learning. In this presentation, my research colleagues and I explained our planning, implementation, and outcomes of the exploration of a university-school partnership that enabled us to prioritize and study three significant components of ISU pre-service teachers’ learning: their classroom field experiences, the in-service teachers with whom they worked, and the university structures that supported them in the field.

In our presentation, we explained how we supported the preparation of ISU pre-service teachers through a collaborative partnership between our early childhood teacher preparation program and a local public elementary school. Important components of the partnership included 1) two-day per week pre-student teaching clinical experiences in the kindergarten through Grade 3 classrooms of the partner school for a full year; 2) weekly collaborative sessions between the pre-service teachers, in-service teachers, and clinical supervisors; 3) a content course for the pre- service teachers, co-taught in the school setting by an early childhood faculty member and in-service teachers from the partner school; and 4) professional learning opportunities in the form of book studies conducted by early childhood faculty members and attended by pre-service and in-service teachers.

Relying on focus groups and interviews with pre-service teachers, in-service teachers, school administration, and university faculty; as well as on observations of pre-service teacher instruction, interactions, and reflections occurring across the school year, we evaluated the ability of the partnership to support the growth of pre-service teachers while maintaining the mission of the school in educating its student population. Utilizing the perceptions of all stakeholders and participants, we determined some aspects of the partnership that appeared to be most beneficial in supporting growth in the pre-service teacher participants, including strong and frequent faculty presence in the school setting, a university course embedded on site, support and mentoring for the pre-service and in-service teachers, and a consistent year-long location for teacher candidates. Demonstrated gains included a) increased pre-service teacher confidence in their practice, (b) improved teaching skills and abilities among pre-service teachers, and (c) stronger relationships and greater collaboration among pre-service and in-service teachers, school administrators, and university faculty.

Implications from this study include more clarity regarding the critical aspects involved with university-school partnerships, a better understanding of how pre- and in-service teachers can be mutually supported, and ultimately, identification of ways that clinical experiences can be maximized through a partnership model. Our interactive presentation provided an opportunity to discuss structures of university/school partnerships in the varied contexts of our presentation attendees. As we explained the results and implications of our ISU partnership practices, we provided opportunities for our audience to share questions or suggestions that further expanded our ideas. I believe this collaborative sharing inspired all of us to delve more deeply into the possibilities for partnerships that move beyond the traditional methods of placing pre-service teachers in schools and toward mutually beneficial collaborative relationships.

Our research work and subsequent presentation at ATE were consistent with the conference theme of Teacher Educators: Inspiring the Future, Honoring the Past in its goal of exploring innovative ways to improve on established methods of teacher education. Having the opportunity to share with teacher educators outside ISU the ways we have studied the learning of our ISU teacher candidates allowed all of us to grow in our understanding of options for building even stronger supports for university/school relationships in support of pre-service teacher growth as well as of methods of studying that important work.