The SoTL Advocate

Making the Case for SoTL Self-Advocacy in Academic Job Searches

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Written by Jennifer Friberg, Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL and Associate Professor, Communication Sciences and Disorders at Illinois State University

Two close friends are currently on the job market. Presently employed as associate professors (or close to that rank!) each has chosen to seek novel adventures elsewhere in academia. Thus, they are in the process of sifting through position descriptions and polishing their teaching and research statements to submit in the coming weeks, following a course familiar to many in higher education.

Each of my friends have been successful disciplinary researchers as well as productive SoTL scholars, though they both represent disciplines that do not consistently value SoTL. As they contemplate phone interviews and campus visits in the near future, they have wondered aloud about how they might contextualize their SoTL work in a way that positions them well in their job searches. While it’s disappointing to me that they have to consider this issue (SoTL should be uniformly valued!), I recognize it’s likely very necessary and, in fact, is smart preparation for their respective job searches.

With that in mind, the contextualization my friends seek as a framework for their SoTL work could actually be a form of SoTL self-advocacy, which I’d define as anything a person does to describe the value of their SoTL work to relevant stakeholders. SoTL self-advocacy might look different across contexts, but in the milieu of a job search, there are definitely steps my friends could take to share the appeal and impact of their SoTL work. Specifically, I would advise each (and would tell others!) that they might do the following to engage in SoTL self-advocacy:

Other ideas for SoTL self-advocacy on the job search? Please post below in the comments section!

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