The SoTL Advocate

Supporting efforts to make public the reflection and study of teaching and learning at Illinois State University and beyond…

ISU’s FY18 SoTL University Research Grants Awarded

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Written by Jennifer Friberg, Cross Endowed Chair in SoTL and Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders

STATE_YourLearningIn mid-June, a total of $20,000 was awarded by the Office of the Cross Endowed Chair at ISU to fund SoTL research in the approaching fiscal year. A total of 21 project proposals were received, making this year’s competition very competitive! Grant awards were made to seven faculty and five students representing a diverse mix of six schools/departments and five colleges across ISU’s campus. Abstracts from each project are presented below. Congratulations to all who earned project funding in this cycle!

Information about this grant program can be found here.

Assessing Dietetics Students Self-Efficacy, Knowledge, and Competence of Small Bowl Feeding Tube Insertion Using Patient Simulation

Julie Raeder Schumacher (Associate Professor) & Jamey Baietto (Gradaute Student), Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

Minimal research exists to validate feeding tube insertion simulation as an effective strategy to teach dietetic students. The purpose of this study will be to assess the change in self-efficacy and content knowledge of ISU dietetics graduate students to place bedside small bowel feeding tubes in simulated patients. Specifically, the following research questions guide this study: 1.) How will students’ knowledge of feeding tube insertion change from per-test to post-test after a simulation lab experience? 2.) How will students’ self-efficacy of feeding tube insertion change following a simulation lab experience? 3.) What will students’ level of competence be during the simulation lab as measured by the Memorial Medical Center Competency Checklist? and 4.) What will students’ perceptions be of their learning experience during the feeding tube insertion simulation lab (assessed via a focus group after lab is completed)?

Assessing Student Learning Outcomes of Participation in Study Abroad Programs at ISU

Lea Cline (Assistant Professor, School of Art), Kathryn Jasper (Assistant Professor, Department of History), & Erin Mikulec (Associate Professor, School of Teaching and Learning)

As a result of internationalization efforts at Illinois State University, more students are participating in study abroad programs offered through the Office of International Studies and Programs (OISP), which estimates there are currently over 90 programs operating in 47 countries. This study will evaluate the professional and personal learning outcomes of students participating in study abroad programs at ISU. The participants represent students participating in these study abroad programs of diverse class rank and major. The proposed project clearly fits SoTL as defined by ISU as the focus of the study is to gather data about and evaluate ISU students’ learning outcomes resulting from living and studying in a unique educational setting. The results of this study will be used to evaluate the impact of study abroad experiences on students’ personal and professional development, including intercultural competence, and to inform current practices for study abroad programs at ISU.

The Rewards of Civic Engagement & Out-of-Class Learning: One Stitch at a Time

Elisabeth Reed (Instructional Assistant Professor) & Sophia Araya (Undergraduate Student), Department of Family and Consumer Sciences

Fix It Friday is a program at Illinois State University in which students majoring in the Fashion Design and Merchandising (FDM) program set up sewing machines in various locations within the surrounding Bloomington-Normal community and offer free basic sewing, mending, and clothing repair services to anyone in need. The fashion students lend their time, talent, and skills on a completely volunteer basis. The purpose of this study to explore student perceptions before and after their volunteer experience, and collect testimonials of both students and customers during the Fix It Friday events. This information will be compiled into a short documentary film to provide a framework and rationale for other schools and Universities to which this program could be implemented. By collecting data on what types of items are fixed while simultaneously accumulating testimonials and feedback from both students and customers, we can attest to the overall holistic merits of the Fix It Friday program. While it is believed that the program has been meaningful and transformative for the students thus far, strategic and methodical research is required in order to assess the out-of-class learning outcomes and the value of civic engagement the Fix It Friday program has brought to both students and community members.

Agile Scrum in a BIS Undergraduate Capstone Course: Going from Being Students to Being Professionals

Roslin Hauck (Associate Professor), Gunjan Amin (Graduate Student), & Cole Mikesell, (Graduate Student), Department of Accounting and Business Information Systems

Agile Scrum is a developmental approach that is becoming increasingly popular as a framework to guide complex software and systems development projects. While the tools, artifacts, and events that are part of Agile Scrum are used to manage teamwork, it does so with the principles of transparency, adaptation, and inspection to encourage the values of commitment, courage, focus, openness, and respect within the Scrum Team (Schwaber & Sutherland, 2016). While the purpose is to ultimately create a technical system, much of the focus of Agile Scrum is on aspects of teamwork, including reflection, communication, self-organization, iterative and empirical learning. In this proposed research study, we will share our experience from both an instructor and student perspectives of the use of Agile Scrum in a Business Information Systems capstone course. In addition to presenting data collected from students from four semesters of  this course (sample size of ~50-60), we will also discuss key artifacts, roles, and activities used in the classroom, such as demonstration exercises, Scrum Master and Product Owner leadership roles, and student and team derived learning objectives and self-assessments.

Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivation: An Experiment on the Role of Competitions in Teaching and Learning

Elahe Javadi (Assistant Professor) & Shaivam Verma (Graduate Student), School of Information Technology

Understanding, analyzing, and interpreting data for making reasoned decisions is a crucial dimension of being a responsible citizen in the digital era. To advance students’ learning experience in an applied data-mining course (IT344), this project aims to design, implement, and evaluate competition-based learning in the course. The study will employ a within-group field experiment design. During the course, students will complete interleaved competition-based and regular predictive modeling assignments. Students’ motivation for learning, satisfaction with learning process, and learning outcomes will be compared for competition and regular assignments.

 

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